EMPortal.info Forum Index The Gateway to Electronic Music
Navigation  •   Portal  •   Forum  •   Profile  •   Search  •   SmartFeed  •   Register  •   Log in to check your private messages  •  Log in

 Peter Baumann - Machines of Desire

Post new topicReply to topic
Author Message
dronescape
musical thief & thoroughly bad guy




Age: 44
Joined: 05 Feb 2007
Posts: 4228
Location: Bobbejaanland, ht lekkerste land!


blank.gif

PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 5:09 pm    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

Quote:
Just out of interest, what�s your take on the Cluster/Moebius/Roedelius/Rother/Schnitzler school of german electronic music? I have always felt that Peter was closer to that scene, especially his solo stuff...


That's certainly true and possibly one reason why Baumann collaborated with Roedelius and Schnitzler in the late 1970s.

If you take Rother as an example, his playing is absolutely tight and spot-on, and so is Jaki Liebezeit's drumming. Same thing with Neu!. As for the rest, it would be helpful to narrow it down a bit -- are you referring to Eruption-era Schnitzler or rather Con-era, or perhaps Die Russen kommen? Neo-classical Roedelius or Grosses Wasser Roedelius and Moebius?

Harmonia has always been a bit too sugary for me, I'm afraid. Cute at best.

« klockwerk » wrote:
So what I think I see here is that after so many years of listening to music made with the precision a DAW enables, they develop a preference for it. [...]


I don't use a DAW so I can't tell. All I use are my ears and a clicktrack, I'm sorry. That's pathetic, I know.

« klockwerk » wrote:
[...] Dronescape, do you ever listen to old Rolling Stones albums (68-73) and do those sound unprofessional also? Sorry to be off topic (EM), but these are the pinnacle of sloppy to me. [...]


It's not my cup of tea musically but there is a difference between an entire band playing sloppy because the bluesy kind of feel demands for this type of syncopated, laid-back type of playing, or whether you're playing along to a rhythmically tight sequencer pattern where you keep missing the obvious downbeat time and time again. I, for one, would have expected Baumann to be a bit better at that.

I would like to give you the answer to your question which I suppose you're expecting to get but I'm afraid I can't, this is like comparing apples and oranges. Or Berlin Philharmonic with Sex Pistols.

Stephen

_________________
"The things you own end up owning you." (Tyler Durden -- Fight Club)

HiddenView user's profileSend private messageVisit poster's website    
cyberiad2001
Very Cool Member





Joined: 04 Feb 2007
Posts: 152
Location: kokkola finland



PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 9:23 pm    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

« dronescape » wrote:

If you take Rother as an example, his playing is absolutely tight and spot-on, and so is Jaki Liebezeit's drumming. Same thing with Neu!. As for the rest, it would be helpful to narrow it down a bit -- are you referring to Eruption-era Schnitzler or rather Con-era, or perhaps Die Russen kommen? Neo-classical Roedelius or Grosses Wasser Roedelius and Moebius?

Harmonia has always been a bit too sugary for me, I'm afraid. Cute at best.


Stephen


I am referring to their most famous work in the 70�s and very early 80�s...the days when they did their most influential albums. Why I mention them in the connection with the "sloppy playing" and Baumann is that I feel they all (including Baumann) were not that interested in musical perfection in classical sense... I have always felt that they were always looking for the capturing of a feeling or a mood. A bit more situationist take on the musical performance; if there was sloppy playing at times, it didn�t matter that much if it was a success on other levels. TD was like that as well in the early days, actually to the day when Peter left/was sacked.

_________________
nemesis http://www.nemesisem.net
http://www.nemesis3.bandcamp.com

OfflineView user's profileSend private messageVisit poster's website    
BruecknerAmbient
One of the Coolest Member




Age: 47
Joined: 11 May 2011
Posts: 4470
Location: Mainz


germany.gif

PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 12:11 pm    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

I think I like people who like sloppy musicians because there's a chance that I'll get away with my own in their case... Laughing

Wink

.

_________________
M I C H A E L B R C K N E R
http://michaelbrueckner.bandcamp.com

OfflineView user's profileSend private messageVisit poster's website    
klockwerk
Cool Member




Age: 63
Joined: 21 Nov 2010
Posts: 94


usa.gif

PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 7:01 pm    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

« dronescape » wrote:
I don't use a DAW so I can't tell. All I use are my ears and a clicktrack, I'm sorry. That's pathetic, I know.


Not 'pathetic' at all. Nor are your opinions I've read here, which are often different from most others. I've tried playing to a clicktrack, and it's definitely a skill.

OfflineView user's profileSend private message    
stevepalmer
One of the Coolest Member




Age: 55
Joined: 16 Jun 2007
Posts: 2505


wales.gif

PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 12:01 pm    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

The experience of listening to Mike Oldfield albums is instructive here. Though he has tried to "tighten up" the technical side of recording, he has been unable (with the possible exception of his most recent release) to capture the magic of the first three albums. But a big part of that magic is the "mistakes" and the "sloppiness" - note those "" marks. It's in that side of the music that a lot of the magic resides.

Too many musicians are far too focused on technique and not enough on mood or feel.

_________________
Downloads at Musiczeit:
http://www.musiczeit.com/directory.php?label=798&title=Stephen+Palmer+Music

OfflineView user's profileSend private message    
Alvaro
One of the Coolest Member





Joined: 18 Mar 2008
Posts: 2575
Location: Sevilla


spain.gif

PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 1:15 pm    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

Wise words.

I do like Tubular Bells II or The Songs of Distant Earth, they are bright and polished, a perfect production work, but the magic of his first three albums, even though Incantations, is evident.

_________________
"I intend to live forever, or die trying
(Groucho Marx)

OfflineView user's profileSend private message    
thirdsystem
One of the Coolest Member





Joined: 25 Nov 2011
Posts: 663


blank.gif

PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 2:51 pm    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

« stevepalmer » wrote:

Too many musicians are far too focused on technique and not enough on mood or feel.


Absolutely. Spot on.

Re Oldfield, I love Songs of Distant Earth also. It must have been hard for him after the magnificence of the early work. Listened to Guitars recently on Spotify btw and enjoyed it .

I will have to listen to Baumanns MOD again , listened a couple of times, again on Spotify, and thought it was pretty good and more original than I had thought it might be.

OfflineView user's profileSend private message    
stevepalmer
One of the Coolest Member




Age: 55
Joined: 16 Jun 2007
Posts: 2505


wales.gif

PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 5:38 pm    (No subject) Reply with quoteBack to top

« Alvaro » wrote:
Wise words.

I do like Tubular Bells II or The Songs of Distant Earth, they are bright and polished, a perfect production work, but the magic of his first three albums, even though Incantations, is evident.


Incantations also has "the magic" (it's my second-favourite MO album after Hergest Ridge) but it is a curious, precise sort of magic...

_________________
Downloads at Musiczeit:
http://www.musiczeit.com/directory.php?label=798&title=Stephen+Palmer+Music

OfflineView user's profileSend private message    
Display posts from previous:      
Post new topicReply to topic


 Jump to:   



Show permissions


© 2007-2016 EMPortal.info
Original logo design by Kimmo Heikkilä

CrackerTracker © 2004 - 2017 CBACK.de
Powered by Orion based on phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group
FI Theme Converted by U.K. Forumimages
All times are GMT + 2 Hours